Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Archive for September, 2019

September is National Mushroom Month. Many recipes I prepare call for mushrooms. But rarely do I think to include them in favorites that don’t list them among the recipe ingredients. That’s a mistake. Mushrooms are beneficial in many ways and can be a part of any healthy diet.

In a study published in the Journal of Nutrition, rats fed a high-fat diet showed fewer signs of atherosclerosis when researchers added portabella and shiitake mushrooms. Future studies may determine if the effect proves true in humans.

Mushrooms contain the minerals, selenium, potassium, copper, iron, and phosphorus. Some reasons to include them in the diet are because they 1) have high concentrations of the antioxidants ergothioneine and glutathione which protect cells, 2) may have some preventive effect on the neurological diseases Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s, 3) may boost memory and reduce mild cognitive decline, 4) improve heart health by substituting for portions of red meats, 5) strengthen bones by converting ergosterol into vitamin D when skin is exposed to sunlight, and 6) increase energy because of rich amounts of B-vitamins which help cells convert glucose into energy.

Benefits may go beyond these assets. Mushrooms can be used freely in many dishes because of texture and flavor. But they are so much more because they are:

  • low in calories
  • fat-free and therefore cholesterol-free
  • gluten-free
  • low in sodium

Related image

Mushrooms are fungi, but their characteristic nutrient content qualifies them to be categorized along with vegetables. The Mushroom Council states that they are wholesome, enjoyable foods that can help fill a void when we fail to eat enough vegetables.

Proponents of including mushrooms in the next Dietary Guidelines for Americans point out advantages because of their properties. These advocates support the concept of “The Blend,” the addition of mushrooms to dishes such as hamburger. Mushrooms enhance flavors due to their distinctive natural unami, and they create a more nutritious product. Such mixtures lower dietary fat and adds vegetable equivalents to the diet, especially significant for school children. Mushrooms can be a healthy asset and improve flavor in sauces, egg dishes (scrambled, omelets, quiche), salads, and meat mixtures (meatloaf, chili, burgers, etc.).

While mushrooms supply numerous nutrients for a healthy body, they are not a panacea. Studies on animals and insects look promising, but it is not a given those results will work in humans. Enjoy them for what they are ─ a delightful food to add for a healthy and tasty diet.

 

Read Full Post »

What causes all those wrinkles as we age? No doubt, our gene pool makes a difference, but are there ways to keep those wrinkles at bay? For years, collagen has been touted as a fountain of youth. Is it?

What is this substance, and how do we get it? The word itself comes from the Greek kolla, meaning glue, and gennao refers to producing, which somewhat explains collagen’s role in the body. It is a protein produced by our bodies primarily from the amino acids glycine, proline, and hydroproline. Collagen, the most abundant protein in the body, is a main component of bones, skin, muscles, and ligament structures.

See the source image

Collagen production decreases as we age. We recognize symptoms of diminishing collagen when wrinkles replace soft, pliable skin. Tendons and ligaments become stiffer, and muscles weaken from shrinking. Worn cartilage causes joint pain and osteoarthritis. While aging may result in discomfort from less collagen, noticeable changes occur in the skin, the largest organ in our bodies. Collagen removes and repairs skin and keeps it moist. Most people notice changes well before middle age as skin loses its elasticity. The face and neck start to develop folds or creases we don’t want. What, if anything, will stop or at least slow the onslaught of wrinkles before we look like a dried prune? Aside from aging, poor diet is the primary reason people don’t have enough collagen.

Hands, Old, Old Age, Elderly, Vulnerable, Care

Food Sources of Collagen:  

Image result for pixabay free clip art foods with zinc and copper

Before spending money on creams, pills, and potions for the skin, consider this. Foods we consume may have a greater impact on skin and wrinkles than any other choices we make affecting health other than smoking and sun exposure. Smoking produces free radicals that damage cells. The sun’s ultraviolet light damages the elastin in skin causing it to sag, stretch, and lose the ability to snap back. The skin also bruises and tears more easily and takes longer to heal. Nothing can repair sun damage, but the skin sometimes repairs itself.

The best food source of collagTangerines, Citrus, Fruit, Clementines, Citrus Fruiten is meat broth. Equally significant are nutrients involved in the production of collagen, primarily Vitamin C (ascorbic acid), zinc, and copper. Vitamin C is abundant in citrus fruits, broccoli and green leafy vegetables, tomatoes, strawberries, cantaloupe, and green and red peppers. Oysters are plentiful in zinc and copper. Other good sources are seafood, dried beans, and dark chocolate. In addition to broth from meat sources, meats provide necessary amino acids as well as zinc and copper to produce collagen.

Supplements:

Varied collagen supplements may help increase collagen production. Before the body can use them, most supplements are broken down into peptides to increase availability. Check labels to confirm if they have been hydrolyzed. However, remember labels may or may not be accurate since food supplements are not regulated by the Food and Drug Administration. Therefore, manufacturers do not have to prove effectiveness or safety of the products sold.

One scientific study of collagen supplements compared to a placebo found that some participants reported improved skin elasticity and decreased joint pain. That does not mean results may hold true for those taking supplements. Because of lack of regulation, consumers have no way of knowing if what they choose is safe and effective.

Image result for food and drug administration free clip art

 

Like many products on the market, collagen supplements may be overrated. One thing is sure. No strong scientific evidence supports collagen supplements in any form to treat or reverse the natural aging process.

Aging remains a fact of life, but appropriate foods and adequate protection of the skin will help keep those wrinkles at bay.

Read Full Post »