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Posts Tagged ‘Weight Management’

I stood before the yogurt case contemplating my grocery needs. A young woman rushed up. “I need to lose ten pound next week,” she said to no one in particular.

“Good luck,” I replied as she hurriedly looked into the refrigerated case and then scurried away.

I could only speculate. Did she have a class reunion the following week-end and suddenly realize she had gained ten pounds since that last momentous gathering? She wasn’t morbidly obese. Nor did she look overweight. But here was a sudden crisis for her. How did she think she would get that weight off so quickly?

Many like her want to do just that. I would like to lose a few pounds myself. I recognize multiple reasons, however, why ten pounds in one week is impossible unless I want to drop dead. From an energy standpoint, most know that 3,500 calories equals one pound. Theoretically, if you eat 3,500 more calories than your body uses, you gain a pound. Likewise, if you burn 3,500 more calories than needed, you lose that same amount. Our bodies need about 1,000 calories just to meet body-function needs even when still or sleeping.

How is it some people actually do lose a great amount in a brief time?That’s difficult to  answer. The very obese are more likely to lose large amounts at first than those closer to their recommended weight. Often the loss is in fluids. Abrupt diet changes may alter metabolism and thereby increase weight loss. Nutrition experts agree that many weight-loss diets are unhealthy, but initially people may lose weight regardless of the type of diet. Once your body adjusts to that diet, weight may plateau, and it becomes difficult to keep losing weight.

Is losing ten pounds a week possible for you? Probably not. To reach and keep a healthy weight, it’s better to decrease calories while increasing exercise or activity and to continue with that changed lifestyle. Before you become discouraged, consider other factors. Losing weight is complicated, and new research seems to pop up every day. Here are a few items that tend to impact weight loss in addition to food and exercise.

  • Do you get enough sleep?
  • Do you drink adequate water?
  • Do you limit artificially sweetened beverages to less than one per day?
  • Do you have stress in your life?
  • Do you take any medications that may cause weight increase? (Ask your physician or pharmacist to see if similar drugs that don’t cause weight gain would be appropriate.)
  • Are you middle aged yet continue with the same eating pattern and exercise routine? (Metabolism slows with age and you need fewer calories and more exercise to keep the same weight.)
  • Have you had a recent health examination to rule out any conditions that may cause retention of fluids or weight gain?

This list is not conclusive. Many things affect weight, but attempting to lose ten pounds in a week isn’t a good idea. Good luck as you strive to reach and keep a healthy weight.

 

 

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You’ve heard the statistics. More and more Americans march (or eat) toward the realm of overweight and obesity. Countless reasons cause excessive weight—overindulgence, too many fast-foods, gobs of fried, sugar-laden delights, and more. The Body Mass Index (BMI) scale serves as one guide to show us where we rank from underweight to obesity.

Do you believe you weigh too much, or do you think you’re about the right size? A Gallup poll, conducted annually, tracks how Americans classify their weight. In 2011, surveyors calculated the BMI of more than 1,000 people based on self-reported height and weight. Nearly sixty-two percent were either overweight or obese. However, most (sixty percent of men and more than half of the women) thought their weight was about right. For both men and women, actual body weight was about twenty pounds more than the BMI ideal. Additionally, perceived ideal body weight climbed to about ten pounds more than two decades past.

The average woman today weighs twenty-two pounds more than her ideal weight compared to thirteen pounds twenty years ago. In 1991, the average man weighed nine pounds more than his ideal body weight compared to fifteen pounds in 2011. The Gallup poll indicated that Americans are getting more overweight and don’t even recognize it.

Even those of us who register a normal weight on the BMI charts may actually be obese. The threshold of percent body weight for obesity is twenty-five for men and thirty for women. Records for BMI and body fat scores of more than 1,300 people found that nearly two-fifths had appropriate weight based on the BMI scale but were obese according to fat scores. The discrepancy may have resulted from the aging process, especially in women, and greater loss of muscle tissue due to lack of exercise.

Are you sure about your ideal weight? How does thinking and actual weight compare with twenty years ago? Perceptions tend to cloud reality as added flesh becomes more acceptable. And now, we can’t even rely on our scales. That should joggle our brains. The best indicator of healthy weight probably is body fat—and few know that percentage. Two things we do know and don’t want to confess. We may not be as small as we like to think.  And we’re reluctant to exercise to help keep those extra calories from turning into blubber.

http://www.gallup.com/poll/150947/Self-0Reported-Weight-Nearly-Pounds-1990.aspx

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/health-17585734?

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If you’re interested in a hot topic, just mention weight. Through the years, different guides have indicated a healthy weight. Since 1998, health professionals have used the Body Mass Index (BMI) as the standard. The BMI identifies normal, overweight, obese, and extreme obesity.

Weight May Number Your Days

The number of pounds you lug around on your body may help determine how long you will live. Overweight and obesity escalate probabilities for many chronic illnesses and worsen others. As the BMI increases, mortality risks for all ages rise. A BMI between 18.5 and 24.9 constitutes a healthy weight. Men with a BMI of 23.5 to 24.9 and women with a BMI of 22.0 to 23.4 show the lowest mortality risks.  

What is your healthy weight? For complete information about BMI and to find the chart to evaluate yourself, go to http://www.win.niddk.nih.gov/publications/PDFs/Weightandwaist.pdf    To find your weight-related risk status, start with an accurate scale to assess current weight. Next, decide your correct height. Now go to the BMI chart at the website above and, if possible, make a copy. In the far left-hand column of the BMI chart find your height and follow with your finger across the chart until you reach your current weight. Move your finger up that column and locate the BMI directly above. Indicate that juncture with an X or make a note of the number if you did not make a copy. If that number is 25 or beyond, mark the weight that would lower your BMI score to 24. Make a note of the weight difference between where you are and where you should be for a healthy weight.

For example, if you are 5’4” and weigh 157 pounds, your BMI is 27. To have a score of 24, you must reduce weight to 140 pounds. That means losing seventeen pounds to have a healthy weight.

Congratulations. You have a starting point. You know where you are physically and where you need to go to lower weight-related risk factors. Now, get ready to lose that extra weight to become a healthier you and maybe live longer.

A graph of body mass index is shown above. The...

Image via Wikipedia

 

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